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on that and say it's already here. so the idea that we should wait for the science to get better, i think, is just, it's too late for that. so the cat is already out of the bag. the question is what do you do now that it's in the courtroom. well, we have dualing experts. we have judges sitting in a gate keeping role who have to decide whether or not the evidence should be admissible and whether it should be permitted in a case. my view is that the more evidence that we can provide to a scrr or to a judge -- jury or to a judge in their decision makings, some objective evidence, some evidence to bolster things like a diagnosis of schizophrenia or i.q., all the better. at the same time we need the critics in the courtroom explaining the shortcomings of the science so that we don't have false evidence that is introduced or undue reliance on science that isn't quite there yet. my preference is recognize it's already there, but make sure that we have robust discussions about the validity of the science before people buy into it too much. >> yeah, i would just add that i basically agree that it's already
to take over the stem industry. that's the science, technology, engineering and math. she is a scientist at one of the leading biotechnology companies. she is the founder of next gene girls. this was started at the grassroots, an organization commit today empowering young women for under represented communities to see themselves in science by introducing the girls to the wonders and the many -- to wonder of the many different scienceses such as engineering, technology and math professions. this is a visionary woman i set before you and it is a privilege to be able to honor her. but a little bit about who she is. she was born in the most beautiful part of san francisco. she was reared in the most wonderful promising talented part of san francisco. and without any further ado, you guys probably guess it had. that's bayview hunters point. you got to give the lady some credit. so, mom and dad, thank you very much for raising outstanding woman. (applause) >> now, ms. jackson, she understands the roadblocks and challenges many of our young people face when it comes to growing up in a challenge
unhelpful concept and i think that you have to ask the question from the legal system and from the science perspective as to what free will might mean. on the science side, the question really is, and this is what we were debating, is the question whether you can operationally define free will so you can measure it? from a scientist's standpoint, a construct doesn't really mean anything if you can't measure it. i have been asked many, many newer scientists including ken, what exactly does free will mean and how do you measure it? it could be like emotional control. it could be something like impulsivity, impulse control and you get back to the basic problem that chris who is a colleague of anita's at vanderbilt, wait he has put it, how do you distinguish and irresistible impulse from an impulse not resisted. there is a basic gray area, a difficult ability to say, did you actually choose that and did you choose it in a way that the law would recognize. so the law all of the time develops concepts that scientists are interested in studying. it might be competency, for example. well, competen
they were merely getting older. i want to talk about that science and how we try to apply in use it to helping people in need. first of all, i want to say that there is a special thing about this plasticity as it relates to ourselves. that is to say it is constructed on the basis of moment to moment association of things that go together or the things that are expected to occur in the next moment in time. one thing that always goes with everything we feel, everything we do, every act we have had, every thought is a reference to the actor, to the player, to the doer, and that references to ourself. all of that derives massive plastic self-reference. we have to construct and enrich a strongly center itself, a person, in our brain through its changing itself in a powerful, plastic way. we're also constructed through these same processes to attach to the other people, to the other things we are close to in life. that is the basis of the attachment of the mother to the child or the child to the mother. through millions of the events of contact and interaction, all of those counts in w
representative, urs, and i will introduce the science who led that team and acted as the consultant to recommend the design criteria and the dvs led the consulting to the tjpa to make sure that the recommendations coming from urs, were reasonable and prudent. and did not not over or under address, the concerns and the nature of the facility and more appropriate for the nature of the facility. widening the associates and specializes in particular, on structural and blast analysis, and vehicle force protection. they have one in 64 years of experience, in that arena since experience with federal laboratories, courthouses embassies, as well as working on the pentagon and many of the same facilities in the city of new york, where dvs has addressed general security issues. they have focused on blast and force protection on those facilities. also as part of the peer review and consulting team to tjpa is code consultants ink. cci, and they focus particularly on fire protection and fire life safety issues and were extensively involved in the peer review of the bus fire and train fire scenari
women in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics. >> i want to welcome all of you to this very full house and this wonderful celebration for women's history month to recognize the efforts of women in our great city and county of san francisco. women's history month is a time to appreciate the contributions of our women leaders in our communities who have been courageous in proving the quality of life for all san franciscans. since 1996, the san francisco commission and the department on the status of women ~ has recognized the vital work and contributions of women throughout our community through this program, and i would like to invite dr. emilie morasi who is the executive director of that agency to say a few words about the history of this event. >> thank you very much, president chiu. i am joined today by commissioner kay [speaker not understood]. i'd like to ask her to come on up. she's very familiar with these chambers, having served as clerk for many, many years. and if there are any other commissioners who joined us, please come on up. i have just returned from japan th
is the co- founder and chief scientific officer of post-it science. he heads the company's goal team that has for more than three decades. he has been a leading pioneer in brain plasticity research. in the late 1980's, he was responsible for inventing something that i hope to own on my own, and in plans to approve my hearing. in 1996, he was the founder and ceo of scientific learning corporation, which markets and distributes software that applies principles of brain plasticity to assist children with language learning in reading. we are plowing -- proud to have him join us today to take part in this forum. [applause] >> thank you. i want to one-upping the mayor and say that today is my 70th birthday. [applause] still alive and raising cain. i also want to say that i am a proud citizen of this city and a public servant at the university of california, in this city for more than 45 years. it is wonderful to be here and wonderful to be with you today. i want to say, before i start, that you should understand that i was permitted by the university of california on a leave of absence fro
near the museum and the california academy of sciences, the garden was designed by the california spring blossom and wildfilower association. here is a truly enchanting and tranquil garden along a path behind a charming gate. this garden is the spot to woo your date. stroll around and appreciate its unique setting. the gorgeous brick walkway and a brick wall, the stone benches, the rustic sundial. chaired the part -- share the bard's word hundred famous verses from a shakespearean plays. this is a gem to share with someone special. pack a picnic, find a bench, and enjoy the sunshine, and let the whimsical words of william shakespeare and floats you and your loved one away. this is one of the most popular wedding locations and is available for reservations. take a bus and have no parking worries. shakespeares' garden is ada accessible. located at the bottom of this hill, it is a secret garden with an infinite in captivating appeal. carefully tucked away, it makes the top of our list for most intimate pyknic setting. avoid all taurus cars and hassles by taking a cable car. or the 30
are three key ethical -- the first one is this. i do not think that there is any legitimate basis in science, medicine, or any ethical code that i know of or the bible, for that matter for our criminal law tdistinguishing between those wo have alcohol and tobacco and people who put other substances in their body. there is no legitimate basis for distinguishing between the alcoholic on the one hand under criminal law and between the drug addict on the other. that is first. the second ethical point is i hope most of you agree with this. i do not believe that anybody should be punished simply for what we put into our own bodies absent harm to others. nobody deserves to be punished for what we put in our bodies absent harm to others. hurt somebody, yes and not tell me your addiction was the excuse. we need to be regarded as sovereign over our minds and bodies. the criminal law should not be treating anyone as a criminal for what we put in here. when one is trying to pursue a particular public health or public safety objective, reducing the harm of drugs or whatever it might be. and when you have
. masters in science, ph.d. in para cytology of tulane university, post doctorate work at rice university, medical degree from the university of pennsylvania in my hometown philadelphia, resident in medicine and fellowship in critical care in anesthesia from ucsf. she joined the ucsf faculty in 1990. in 1999 she was appointed chief of anesthesia at san francisco general, a position she held until 2005. in 2004 she was appointed associate dean. besides currently serving as vice dean, she is also currently a professor of clinical anesthesia and medicine where she is educating the next generation of doctors at ucsf. in her time at ucsf dr. carlysle has won numerous awards, including the stuart c. colin award for clinical excellence and faculty clinical award, the elliott rapoport award for%backerfor commitment to san francisco general, and chancellor's faculty award for the advancement of women. for decades ucf doctors like dr. carlysle have staffed and run san francisco general hospital providing serve isx for people all over the city including many of our lowest income and at-risk resident
of the subcommittee on commerce, justice, and science. thanks for being here. i want to first get a sense of where we are in the investigation. the fbi. how soon do you expect it will be revealing the contents? he tried to leave the kutcher for china. >> he's in prison. he's in jail. they should be within the next couple of days. lou: we listen to fbi director muller talk about how serious the problem has become. i have a strange feeling that if we did not have your voice on this right now there would not be a discussion of what is happening in nasa. various science centers, our national laboratories, and the full breadth of what is the chinese spying efforts of all sorts in this country, not just simply cyber spying, but 3500 from companies. this is a major threat against this country. >> it is a major threat. every major american company has been hit with a cyber attack. everyone. i have seen the list. the university's, foundations, major law firms. they hit my area. they took everything off of my computer a few years ago. people have been reluctant to speak out about it. what is so shocking and ma
in the department of exercise and sports science. i think it is a good match for me to be demonstrating the wii, which is a good physical activity. i am joined on the stage by a student, not from usf, but from san francisco state. we actually talk to each other. this is mackenna. >> good morning. >> finally, i am joined by alicia from the independent living center in san francisco. it is great for all of you to be here today. people will be trickling in over the next half hour. we will give you a taste of what wii is like. we have set up the game. i will start by playing mackeena in a game of tennis. the interesting thing about wii is we use this little remote. just by moving our arms, we can control movement on the screen. you will be watching up on the big screen as we play a game of tennis. are you ready? all right. we will select two players. that is me. does that look like me? it kind of those -- of does. does that look like mackenna? that is not by chance. you can make the person look like anything you want. they can even look like aliens. interesting. we are going to play some great tenn
golden age this span of the 17th century where trade, industry and science were among the world. the one small port of amsterdam were one of the commercial centers in the entire world. this concentration of capital enriched bankers and merchants but also created the society in europe. the arch of the dutch golden age. 17th century travelers visiting holland remarked on the number of artist. typically western european artist on the monarch and the nobility as well as the very wealthie catholic church. an open market to a wide clientele that arranged from variety of merchants. it displays a modern domestic rather than extravagant or royal setting which it was carried. emily who is the director of the morris house. the expansion which i will talk about in an a little bit will give it more space. for the collection there is a limited pictures they can acquire but too large for the building. so where do the paintings come from? how can they be there. this is an exceptional and remarkable museum. this splendid 17th century city palace was constructed between 1633-1634 next to the dutch gove
. >> plus the science behind nature very own alarm [ man ] it's big. fast. safe. quickly reconnects families. same with aladdin. brings families back together. aladdin became the biggest in bail by treating people right. no one has lower prices, is faster or more professional than aladdin. we'll get you through it. aladdin bail bonds. bigger because we're better. barrow island has got rare kangaroos. ♪ chevron has been developing energy here for decades. we need to protect their environment. we have a strict quarantine system to protect the integrity of the environment. forty years on, it's still a class-a nature reserve. it's our job to look after them. ...it's my job to look after it. ♪ ask. >> this is 7 news. >> we of think of the urged interest need for food at bay area food bank around the holiday. but urgent need for help from the alameda county have had bank tonight. they will be completely out of donations bit end of this week. many of the shelves empty at the berkeley food pantry that relies heavily on the county food bank for did nation. demand for food expected to rise durin
that i only heard in eighth grade science class, the last science class i had, the chart has gone parabolic. did i ever claim to work at the jet propulsion lab? what it meant was that stocks had started to go up in pretty much a very steep slope. this is a parabola. so steep that the angle is getting a little dangerous if you're all the way up here, right? here it's still pretty good and you get there and it's a nice place to plunge, right? and you got to wait so that time would pass and it wouldn't be such a steep parabola. she wasn't saying that we were going to crash at all. she wasn't saying the companies weren't any good. she was simply stating that it leaves little room for error particularly when you're in the straight-up portion of the parabola. it's plenty of them as this list of parabolic stocks that i wrote down shows. this is incredible. i know. i hadn't really had this many stocks in parabola motion and they've risen the highest and the hardest and the ones taking the cake are the insurers and the banks, some of the transports. those insurers and bank stocks were stro
bob can retire at a more appropriate age. it's not rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. >>> on capitol hill today the man who runs nasa was asked, what could be done if a large meteor were headed for new york city? his answer? pray. cnn's chris lawrence has more on today's hearings. pretty scary stuff going on, chris. >> you said it, wolf. the only reason people aren't scared out of their minds is the fact that it's so rare for one of these big rocks to hit the earth. but look. there are 10,000 to 20,000 asteroids out there big enough to devastate a continent and only 10% have been detected. russians saw a flash of light and heard the sonic boom. the meteor exploded with the force of a nuclear bomb. it did $30 million in damage and injured thousands. and no one saw it coming. >> we were fortunate that the events of last month were simply an interesting coincidence rather than a catastrophe. >> reporter: the nation's top science officials were called before congress tuesday to explain what they're doing to detect similar threats from space. >> objects as large
kids' education, science and research. they also cut medicaid which affects a lot of those seniors on medicare, about 20% of those seniors are also on medicaid. but it's at the end of that 10-year window that our republican colleagues then move to their voucher plan, premium support, i don't care what you call it. the only way you're going to achieve any savings compared to the baseline numbers, c.b.o. baseline that the chairman showed you, the only way you're going to do it is if you're capping the amount you're going to get so that seniors have to eat the costs and take the risks of rising health care. now, there's a better way to address that issue and that is the way we approach it in our budget and that is to build on the kind of reforms that we made in the affordable care act, in obamacare, which have helped and contributed to reducing the rapid rise in per capita health care costs and which as i pointed out earlier our republican colleagues included in their own budget. so, yes, we have to deal with these drivers of costs, including health care. but the way we propose to do
-intellectual, ain't science and uncurious. despite successes of right wing broadcasters, like glenn beck and hannity, and despite the success of populist-ish governors like scott walker and bobby jindal and despite the effectiveness of the tea party in corralling conservatism in a grassroots cause, the movement has been successfully demonized by liberals as plutocratic, corporatist, anti-other and anti-poor. i believe both are unfair characterizations. if politics is perception, then conservatism is failing on both fronts. the good news is the job of revitalizing both the movement's hitch history of intellectualism and every man tradition has two very capable applicants. the bad news is, they will need to work together. rand paul and marco rubio are often pitted against one another competes for influence and authority, at times they seem to encourage this and may, in fact, end up competing in 2016. but their differences now and until then should be exploited in productive ways for the party that addressed those two deficiencies. paul's ayn randian highly intellectualized conservatism is informed by
, a reporter for al-jazeera english and the christian science monitor, about today's violence in baghdad and life in post-war iraq. welcome jane. what is known about who or what's behind today's car bombings and suicide attacks? >> well, the finger, judy, is always pointed at al qaeda and al qaeda-linked groups. because they view the attacks to have the fingerprints of that organization. it was extremely coordinated attack as you saw, more than 20 bombs, many car bombs and then for good measure they threw in some suicide bombers as well as sticky bombs on the bottoms of buses. most shi'a target and security targets. that sits in to what al qaeda is doing, try to destabilize the country by showing people its security forces can't protect them and trying to stir up the sectarian war that this country has recently emerged from. if. >> woodruff: how unusual is it to have so many attacks on the same day? >> it was a bad day, that is certainly indisputable. i was at a university today talking to university students and they were holding a party because they were graduating. you can see the smo
? >> guest: we are happy to wind the popular science ces 2013 future product of the year so it's an honor and we have worked hard to understand consumers and their needs and health care and the financial models that identify how we can fix those problems so it's nice to have all come it all come together. >> host: steve cashman walk us through what happens. let's go over here. >> guest: so imagine you have woken up and you don't feel very well. you have a fairly good idea of what you have. we have all been there right? been there right? gouda legatum how do i get to my doctor and get my prescription picked that? with us you have a couple of options. you can go on your iphone look for the closest health spot, type in what your conditions are and we are to have your insurance card stored in the clouds all cloud so all that normal sitting in the waiting room is gone. now that you have found a a health spot and it has been and consumer pharmacy buy your home you will walk up to our healthspot station. you will go right in there and find hey i'm a returning patient. i can come up to this and g
the beautiful oakland cathedral and acacademy of science and certainly at work on mass coney center expansion the early work on the warriors a marine eye and so many iconic projects in both northeastern and fortunately and southern california and wells fargo such an integral institution and part of of the fabric of our society and vaginal foalgee president the bay area region together encompassing this whole wide region for wells far going and we are soon going to hear from tim quinn written economist from wells far go and going to get some insight from him and a major focus and this says so much about the strength of our economy and the economy is small business lending and really promising news and 2012 wells far go expended scene billion dollars in that now loan commitments to small businesses across the united states over 30% in 2011 and that is great news so thank you wells fargo and many thanks to our partners in associations who always help us in promote things event it takes a villages to market deimagine. >> joseph markenson, md: and new president and c o oavment bob electric sway an
and steam skills. science, frontpage, engineering, arts and math. those are the key skill sets. and i had a chance to meet with all of our san francisco chancellor and is i see chancellor here today from -- state and he joined me with chancellor helm man from uc s f city college our own public schools superintendentent to form a major education leadership counsel to advise me in making sure that the skill sets that we need in the jobs in the future are being trained and reflected in the education curriculum and how to support not only the institutions, but all of the different programs that we can use to lift up all of the educational stands for our youth i have person learn adopted 12 middle schools in san francisco to make sure each principal gets what they need to campus to support teachers effort on campus to raise the educational needs of the schools. middle school is the biggest challenge with truancy and educational challenges and we know that while we are increasing the performance stand of the whole cities one of the highest increases in the whole state is happening here in the
education, job training, health care and advanced science and research. even with these investments, our budget is projected to reduce the deficit by approximately $2.8 trillion over the decade compared to the c.b.o.'s baseline which incidentally does not include the savings that we will achieve through the winding down of the wars in iraq and afghanistan. that will put us on a sustainable goal and more than meets the the goal. so we feel that is a responsible goal. now this number is pessimistic, because with the jobs bill, we think we are going to do a lot better because of the similar effect it has on the economy. this is in stark contrast to the committee report, which has vague numbers, numbers that don't add up or don't give you a clue as to where they're going to get the money. the budget has a reduction in tax rates. does not say how you are going to make that revenue neutral, where you are going to assign the $5 trillion in taxes to make it revenue neutral. they block grant medicaid. by the time the end of 10 years, it's one-third of where it needs to be to maintain benefits. 2/
office said this. >> way too many people believe republicans are anti-immigrant, anti-woman, anti-science, anti-gay, anti-worker, and the list goes on and on and on. >> if that from jeb bush and the background birther thing and the proud wacko bird thing, what would you do? what would you do almost before sunrise on the following monday morning to prevent those clips from getting any other air-time than they absolutely had to get? what would you do to step on that news? what happened early this morning to knock those clips right out of the headlines? if you think most hybrids are a bit under sized then this will be a nice surprise. meet the 5-passenger ford c-max hybrid. c-max come. c-max go. c-max give a ride to everyone it knows. c max has more passenger volume than competitor prius v and we haven't even mentioned... c-max also gets better mpg. say hi to the super fuel efficient ford c-max hybrid. for the things you can't wash, freshen them with febreze. febreze eliminates odors and leaves a light, fresh scent. febreze, breathe happy. watch this -- alakazam! ♪ [ male announcer ] stapl
't want to you miss this tuesday night. first up today the committee on science, space and technology held a hearing on threats from outer space. utah representative scries stewart, he himself from out of space asked the panel if the government is obligated to inform citizens of an incoming as steroid. >> if we were to determine there was a threat and then determine even that it was actually potentially devastating, do we have a policy as to whether we would share that information with the public and how we would do that? i don't know whether fema, which would have that responsibility has developed a former protocol, we can get back to that. >> i wish you would. i would be curious to know that. >> michael: i would be curious to know that too representative. according to today's testimony we're decade behind detecting as steroids capable ofas asteroids that are capable of destroying a city. >>> speaking of threats from space, a nook north korean propaganda film is bomb mongering mongering the united states. why does this make me feel like the president of the a.v. club is threatening us? an
as 12 hours. yeah, it's fast. clearasil, the science of clear skin. [ male announcer ] it's red lobster's lobsterfest our largest selection of lobster entrees like lobster lover's dream or new grilled lobster and lobster tacos. come in now and sea food differently. visit redlobster.com now for an exclusive $10 coupon on two lobsterfest entrees. cheap is good. and sushi, good. but cheap sushi, not so good. it's like that super-low rate on not enough car insurance. pretty sketchy. ♪ ♪ and then there are the good decisions. like esurance. their coverage counselor tool helps you choose the right coverage for you at a great price. [ stomach growls ] without feeling queasy. that's insurance for the modern world. esurance. now backed by allstate. click or call. >> john: welcome back quick question for the panel. tomorrow marks the ten year anniversary of the iraq war. what stands out for you ten years later about iraq judy gold? >> i have to say it's the veterans. these young kids who are hurt, who have no jobs, who are--i ju
things, like each other, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. >>> is social >>> is social media working for companies? coke has something to say about it and julia boorstin has more. >> that's right. online buzz or social chatter has no impact on short-term sales and it is the most popular brand on facebook with 62 million likes and 700,000 twitter followers. facebook actually agrees, saying quantity of chatter doesn't matter and citing a study of more than 600 campaigns that focused on getting the message in front of more people rather than generating more buzz had 70% more return on investment. coke has no plans on changing strategy saying that the display ads on facebook are 90% as effective as tv media. >> let's continue this conversation as we jump off it. i want to give you the results of our yahoo! finance poll. does facebook and social media influence what you buy? 3% said yes and 11% said from time to time and 86% said it never does. gm basically said they were not going to spend any money or time on social media because it was not wor
in political science from the university of massachusetts. the doctor's degree is from dartmouth college. doctor, you are invited to take the podium. [applause] >> thank you. i first want to thank the senator for making progress and including me in this important work that they are doing and making that link between looking at lgbt health and hiv and a portal to act. we started off with president obama giving a historic speech speech in 2011 at ending the aids epidemic at some point in our lifetime. this was quite a moment. the moment of opportunity and optimism that i want to start with. the reason the president obama made that statement is because we have a combination that together is something that could turn the tide on epidemics. we also have a national strategy that the white house about a couple of years ago and provides a roadmap. more than a million people are living with hiv in the united states. for the last decade, they have been at the same level and perhaps more alarmingly, you and infections are rising by those who represent 66% of their infections in the united states.
to focus on other things, like each other, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. >>> welcome >>> welcome back to "squawk box". the government housing starts report for february. it's expected to show a 1.6% increase from january to annual rate of 904,000 units. boeing technical workers approved a new four-year contract, the same they voted to reject a month ago. they made no recommendation this time around. and we are still a waiting a vote from parliament in cyprus. it is expected to reject that tax on bank deposits that was part of a bailout reached by european leaders over this weekend. we'll see what happens. andrew, back over to you. >> thanks, becky. arianna huffing ton. we talked about sleep. not a lot of sleep going on in cyprus. do you have a view? >> i think it's a terrible decision. >> i don't think it's a terrible decision. i just don't think it's the end of the world. >> many decisions are not the end of the world. but it's a terrible decision. deposits under 100,000 euros. also it is a decision fueled by germany. the german public is angr
never been a chess team gang rape where the community has rallied around -- this guy won the science contest last year. >> but that has to be indicative of the way we are society wise. these are the kids that are partying and socializing. >> hal: i don't know i socialized quite bathe with my friends, and while i didn't drink or do drugs, i went to a lot of parties where there was dunking and other stuff going on, there were certainly kids knocking boot upstairs but it was all consensual, and we had sports guys in our crowd, and nerds in our crowd and it was a nice mix of human beings. it just seems to me when you start going -- protected class about any particular group, and it seemed like to me that sport figures are the one area where you -- and it almost -- sadly there might be a back end to it in that okay we we're going to train certain kids to act like animals, and when they act like animals we can't be that surprised. it's our fault for turning them into -- well we did since the age of 6 put a helmet on this kid and tell him to kill. so rather than fa
a colleague here in congress brush off the warnings of science about climate change, saying, "god's still up there," implying that there's no need to worry about climate change. well, if god is still up there, what better use of the gifts of moral reasoning that we have been given as his people than to protect his creation and one another from harm? madam president, as we sing in the old hymn, "field and forest, veil and mountain, flowering meadow, flashing sea, chanting bird and flowing fountain call us to rejoice in thee." we are each called in our own way to wake up and to do the right thing. i yield the floor. mr. nelson: madam president? the presiding officer: the senator from florida. mr. nelson: madam president, i just want to comment on the senator from rhode island's comments. first of all, i know it's so heartfelt and so genuine, and i want to thank him for that. and i want to thank him from approaching it from a faith-based standpoint about this fragile ecosystem that we live on called planet earth. and he's brought a perspective with that chart that he had of the earth that it is
-woman, anti-science, anti-gay, anti-worker, and the list goes on and on and on. >> if that from jeb bush and the background birther thing and the proud wacko bird thing, what would you do? what would you do almost before sunrise on the following monday morning to prevent those clips from getting any other air-time than they absolutely had to get? what would you do to step on that news? what happened early this morning to knock those clips right out of the headlines. was a record collection. no. there was that fuzzy stuff on the gouda. [ both ] ugh! when it came to our plants... we were so confused. how much is too much water? too little? until we got miracle-gro moisture control. it does what basic soils don't by absorbing more water, so it's there when plants need it. yeah, they're bigger and more beautiful. guaranteed. in pots. in the ground. in a ukulele. are you kidding me? that was my idea. with the right soil... everyone grows with miracle-gro. [ male announcer ] from the way the bristles move to the way they clean, once you try an oral-b deep sweep power brush, you'll never go bac
. >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> ifill: today's supreme court arguments pitted a national law against a 2004 arizona voter registration bill. the case explores the extent of state powers against the controversial backdrop of voting restrictions. arizona's proposition 200 requires state residents to provide either a driver's license, passport, birth certificate or physical proof of citizenship before they can vote. but an existing federal law requires only a sworn statement of citizenship on a voter registration form. supporters say the arizona measure cuts down on voter fraud by keeping noncitizens from voting. but opponents argue the law unfairly tarring hes minorities, immigrants, and the elderly. the case is only the most recent dispute betw
. science and evidence based drug and alcohol treatment center. where your addiction stops and your new life begins. call now. >> tomorrow night, one special guest to talk about it. michael moore. that's tomorrow night on cnn morgan live. "anderson cooper" starts now. and authorities have 3 1/2 years to investigate this man's killing. now people where he lived in mississippi and died want to know why didn't his life count. one of whom, the victim's mother, joins us tonight. >>> yet another stunning claim in the jodi arias trial about why she's so fuzzy on the details. can stabbing, shooting and slashing somebody just slip your mind? we'll ask an expert. >>> we begin with breaking news you'll only see here. a mother speaking out tonight about the rape of her 16-year-old daughter and the verdict against the two young men who were just convicted of it. in steubenville, ohio, a town where high school football is king, these two rapists who assaulted this woman's 16-year-old daughter were local royalty, heroes on the playing field. elsewhere, seemingly untouchable. so much so that despite their r
to his last, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. it's just common sense. [ female announcer ] some people like to pretend a flood could never happen to them. and that their homeowners insurance protects them. [ thunder crashes ] it doesn't. stop pretending. only flood insurance covers floods. ♪ visit floodsmart.gov/pretend to learn your risk. omnipotent of opportunity. you know how to mix business... with business. and you...rent from national. because only national lets you choose any car in the aisle. and go. you can even take a full-size or above. and still pay the mid-size price. i could get used to this. [ male announcer ] yes, you could business pro. yes, you could. go national. go like a pro. >> president obama's new headache tonight. just hours ago. the president named the head of the justice department civil rights division thomas perez to be the president's next secretary of labor. moments later republican secretary david vitter said he would block that nomination. he joins us. >> good to be with you. >> greta: why do you want to block
science and evidence based drug and alcohol treatment center. where your addiction stops and your new life begins. call now. barrow island has got rare kangaroos. ♪ chevron has been developing energy here for decades. we need to protect their environment. we have a strict quarantine system to protect the integrity of the environment. forty years on, it's still a class-a nature reserve. it's our job to look after them. ...it's my job to look after it. ♪ >> wow. >> i have no idea what that means and i doubt you do, either. >> i do, actually. i watch mixed martial arts. i'll explain it to you later. thanks very much. we'll be right back. >>> we ran out of time for the "ridiculist." we'll be back one hour from now, another edition of "360" at >> is it time to make a deal with republicans? and a terrifying discovery on a college campus in florida. guns, bombs and a plan. let's go "out front." >> good evening, everyone. out front tonight, message in a bomber. the pentagon announcing it's going to be flying nuclear-capable b-52 bombers intended to send a signal to north korea's leade
's progressive. call or click today. science and evidence based drug and alcohol treatment center. where your addiction stops and your new life begins. call now. >> is it time to make a deal with republicans? and a terrifying discovery on a college campus in florida. guns, bombs and a plan. let's go "out front." >> good evening, everyone. out front tonight, message in a bomber. the pentagon announcing it's going to be flying nuclear-capable b-52 bombers intended to send a signal to north korea's leader. now, north korea intends to send some strong messages of its own. we have a new video that we found posted to a semi-official government web site in north korea. second one that we foupd that depicts a north korean attack on u.s. soil. the other which was posted to the same website last month showed a nuclear strike on new york city set to the song "we are the world." "out front" tonight, the ranking member on the intelligence committee joins us. good to see you, sir. i appreciate you taking the time. i want to ask you first about this video that we found, the second one as i said in over a mo
in terms of the science behind basically the premonition that jodi arias did forget because she was under so much stress, which will is documented in cases like this, but it is taken with a grain of salt in this one because they are remember nothing conveniently about the sactual stabbing. >> intriguing. >>> the fbi now says it know who was behind one of the largest art thefts in the country. [ chainsaw buzzing ] humans. sometimes, life trips us up. sometimes, we trip ourselves up. and although the mistakes may seem to just keep coming at you, so do the solutions. like multi-policy discounts from liberty mutual insurance. save up to 10% just for combining your auto and home insurance. call liberty mutual insurance at... to speak with an insurance expert and ask about all the personalized savings available for when you get married, move into a new house, or add a car to your policy. personalized coverage and savings -- all the things humans need to make our world a little less imperfect. call... and ask about all the ways you could save. liberty mutual insurance -- responsibility. what's y
, in science and research, in education. things that are important to power the economy. our focus has been on jobs first. let's get the economy in full gear. not put the brakes on it. which is what the republicans do. they've gotten austerity budget that according to the nonpartisan congressional budget office, will result in 750,000 fewer jobs bn i end of the year. so we say let's tackle the deficit in a smart way, get people back to work and reduce it over a steady period over a period of time and our comes to balance at the same time that the republicans' budget from last year comes into balance. >> on the issue of revenue, i believe your budget has about $200 billion more in revenue than senator murray's budget in the senate. why did you put that in there considering that republicans are so adverse to any new revenue? >> the budget we have in our democratic proposal. if you take it even together with the revenue from the fiscal cliff agreement, is still less total revenue, luke, than was embedded in the bipartisan simpson-bowles agreement. so we have less revenue proposed by that bipar
't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. >>> crazy >>> crazy day. crazy day. volatility is back. >> but this market will not quit. that's the bottom line. >> and i'll tell you what, as much as we downplay the size of cyprus and its impact economically on the eu, it has had an impact on our markets. this is when we thought we'd heard that the finance minister in cyprus had offered his resignation and it wasn't accepted. now he's denying that he's offered his resignation. whatever that means. and then we get this move here in the last hour on talk that maybe the ecb was going to offer more liquidity, which they've confirmed, but what does that mean? are they going to bail them out or not? we'll see. we're moving higher here.
with ink from chase. science and evidence based drug and alcohol treatment center. where your addiction stops and your new life begins. call now. >>> tonight, the steubenville rape case is far from over. are there more convictions to come? what about the new threats against the victim? i talk to attorneys on both sides. >>> plus my exclusive interview with the father of one of the high school football stars who was found guilty. >>> and tracy lords, herself a victim of rape in steubenville. >> i think that there is a sickness in that city. >>> also inside the mind of a killer. reports of adam lanza's bizarre obsession with mass murderers. 500 of them listed on a spreadsheet seven feet long. was it all just a video game come real to him. >>> and crime and punishment with a woman who scares the daylights out of me and millions around the world. patricia cornwell on true crime stories, who done it and why. >>> inside the lion's cage, what really happened when a big cat killed a 24-year-old intern? the deadly power of wild animals and my exclusive with the people who run the animal sanctuar
any surprise fees. ♪ it's not rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. >>> now to the buried lead. it's a story we think isn't getting enough play. president obama is racking up the air miles on his first trip to the holy land as commander-in-chief and everyone is talking about that but what they're not talking about is the fact that the president will also be visiting the country of jordan. word that country's leader will have a pretty stark warning to the president. i want to bring in jeffrey goldberg who is breaking this story in "the atlantic" magazine to talk about why this is so significant. your article is entitled "monarch in the middle" about king abdula. he warned you of a muslim brotherhood crescent rising over the middle east. explain what he meant by that and the reaction in the region to this new magazine article. >> well, you know, he's a lonely guy these days. he's part of a dwindling group of arab leaders. you know, he was allies with the president of tunisia, the president of egypt, mubarak. these guys are gone. what's replacing them are more m
administration realizes we need a no-fly zone. we need to arm the rebels about. this is not exact science what to do there. we need to take sides. the darwin one evolution what is happening in syria, hundreds of thousands of dead. a central country with a diversity of population could have been one of the shining lights now because of the evil nature of the assad regime being destroyed before our eyes. melissa: doctor, thank you for coming on, thank you. >> anytime, melissa. melissa: coming up on "money", soaring health care costs slamming businesses and workers across the country but a radical new approach could put workers in control of what is spent. we'll explain that. because at the end of the day you know it, it is all about money. ♪ . ♪ ♪ [ male announcer ] how do you engineer a true automotive breakthrough? ♪ you give it bold styling, unsurpassed luxury and nearly 1,000 improvements. the redesigned 2013 glk. see your authorized mercedes-benz dealer for exceptional offers through mercedes-benz financial services. ...amelia... neil and buzz: for teaching us that you can't create
. clearasil, the science of clear skin. can become major victories. i'm phil mickelson, pro golfer. when i was diagnosed with psoriatic arthritis my rheumatologist prescribed enbrel for my pain and stiffness, and to help stop joint damage. [ male announcer ] enbrel may lower your ability to fight infections. serious, sometimes fatal events including infections tuberculosis lymphoma, other cancers, nervous system and blood disorders, and allergic reactions have occurred. before starting enbrel your doctor should test you for tuberculosis and discuss whether you've been to a region where certain fungal infections are common. you should not start enbrel if you have an infection like the flu. tell your doctor if you're prone to infections, have cuts or sores have had hepatitis b have been treated for heart failure, or if you have symptoms such as persistent fever bruising, bleeding or paleness. since enbrel helped relieve my joint pain, it's the little things that mean the most. ask your rheumatologist if enbrel is rig
that a computer glitch is putting the mars rover "curiosity" science experiments on a bit of a hold right now. nasa says it is still in contact with its good friend rover up there and hopes to have it fully functioning this week but it comes after "curiosity" made the most significant discovery yet that by confirming the red planet had the ability to possibly support some forms of life. that is what they're always looking for up there on the red planet. casey stiegel is checking out all of this in dallas. why do they think they believe life could have existed up there? >> reporter: hey, martha, good morning. biased primarily on the existence of water. scientists long thought it was on the red planet but only in the form of ice and now "curiosity" is essentially proving that theory wrong. they have discovered a ancient network of rivers up there have dried up but areas were formed by running water, possibly more than three billion years ago? the rover has been drilling down into the martian surface as well and finding elements like carbon, nitrogen and oxygen, things that living organisms need
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